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Corporate Culture

The article subjects the assumptions and prescriptions of the Corporate Culture' literature to critical scrutiny. the body of the article is devoted to teasing out the distinctive basis of its appeal compared with earlier management theory. It is seen to build upon earlier efforts (e.g. 'theory Y') to constitute a self-disciplining form of employee subjectivity by asserting that 'practical autonomy' is conditional upon the development of a strong corporate culture. the paper illuminates the dark side of this project by drawing to the subjugating and totalitarian implications of its excellence/ quality prescriptions to this , parallels are drawn with the philosophy of control favored by the Party in Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four. Specifically, the paper critiques the 'doublethink' contention that autonomy can be realized in monocultural conditions that systematically constrain opportunities to wrestle with competing values standpoints and their associated life projects.

Has university really changed?

University science is now in real crisis - particularly the non-telegenic, non-ology bits of it such as chemistry, Since 1996, 28 universities have stopped offering chemistry degrees, according to the Royal Society of Chemistry. The society that as few as six departments (those at Durham, Cambridge, Imperial, UCI., Bristol and Oxford) could remain by 2014. Most recently, Exeter University closed down its chemistry department. blaming it on "market forces", and Bristol took in sonic of the refugees., The closures have been blamed on a in student applications, but money is a : chemistry degrees are expensive to provide - compared with English, for example - and some scientists say that the way the government concentrates research on a small number of top departments, such as Bristol, exacerbates the problem.

Essays arc used as an assessment tool to your ability to research a topic and eonstnict an , as well as your understanding of subject content. This does not mean that essays are a 'regurgitation' of everything your lecturer has said the course. Essays are your opportunity to explore in greater depth aspects of the course - theories, issues, texts, etc. - and in some cases relate these aspects to a context. It is your opportunity to articulate your ideas, but in a way; using formal academic style.

Egg-eating

Snacks Egg-eating snakes are a small group of snakes whose diet  only of eggs. Some eat only bird's eggs. which they have to whole, as the snake has no teeth. Instead, these snakes have spines that stick out from the backbone. The spines crack the egg open as it through the throat. Once the e -! is punctured, muscles in the snake's body work in waves to squeeze out the contents. which then move down into the stomac

First Year Students

For many first-year students, the University may be their first experience living away from home for an extended period of time. It is a break from home. In my point of view this is the best thing that you can do. i know you have to fend for yourself, cook and clean after yourself, basically look after yourself without your parents but the truth is - some time in your life you arc going to have to part with lovely Mummy and Daddy. But they are only just a phone call away and it is really good to have some quality time without them. The first few weeks can be a lonely period_ There may be concerns about forming friendship. When new students look around, it may seem that everyone else is self-confident and socially successful! The reality is that everyone is having the same . Increased personal freedom can feel both wonderful and frightening. Students can come and go as they choose with no one to -hassle" them. The strange environment with new kinds of procedures and new people can create the sense or being on an emotional roller coaster. This is normal and to be expected_ You meet so many more people in the halls than if you stayed at home. The main points about living away from home are: NO PARENTS! You don't have to tell them where you're going, who you're going with, what time you'll becoming, why you're going etc. etc. You learn various social skills; you have to get along with your roommates Living with them can present special, sometimes intense, problems. Negotiating respect of personal property, personal space, sleep, and relaxation needs, can be a complex task. The complexity increases when roommates are of different backgrounds with very different values. It is unrealistic to expect that roommates will be best friends. . new relationships should not be expected to develop overnight. It took a great deal of time to develop intimacy in high school friendships; the same will be true of intimacy in university friendships. You have a phone! So if you ever get homesick or miss you Mummy then she's always at the end of a phone-line for you - and so arc your friends.

The allure of the hook

The allure of the book has always been negative and positive, for the texts and pictures between the covers have helped many young readers to and grasp the world around thcm in a pleasurable and meaningful way. But the allure has also enabled authoni and publishers to prey upon young readers' dispositions and desires and to them a menu that turns out to be junk food.

Where does wind come from?

The world's atmosphere is forever on the move. Wind is air in motion. Sometimes air moves slowly, giving a breeze. At other times it moves rapidly creating gales and hurricanes. Gentle or fierce, wind always starts in the same way. As the sun moves through the sky, it heats up some parts of the sea and land more than others The air above these spots is warmed, becomes lighter than the surrounding air, and begins to rise. Elsewhere, cool air sinks, because it's . Winds blow because- air squeezed out by sinking, cold air is sucked in under rising, warm air. Winds will blow wherever there i a in air temperature and pressure.

Buy a house

Buying a can be a daunting process, .. Firstly you need to work out how much ... budget planner if you don't already have one. ...rate increases and for other events .. different ownership ratio to the normal 50/50. ... the course of events, settlement takes ... group certificates for the two years.

Hans Christian

• Andersen Fans of biographical criticism have a luxurious source in the works of Hans Christian Andersen. Like Lewis Carroll (and, to a lesser extent, Kenneth Grahame), Andersen was near-pathologically uncomfortable in the company of adults. Of course all three had to work and with adults, but all three really related well to children and their simpler worlds. Andersen, for a time, ran a puppet theater and was incredibly popular with children, and, of course, he wrote an impressive hotly of fairy tales which have been produced in thousands of editions since the 19th century. Most everyone has read or at least knows the titles of many of Andersen's works: "The Ugly Duckling." "The Emperor's New Clothes," "The Nightengalc," "The Little Mermaid," "The Match Girl," and many others.

• Though, as with most folk and fairy tales, they adult re-readers much differently than they do young first-time readers. Charming talcs of ducks who feel because they don't fit in only to exult in the discovery that they are majestic swans, gives child readers clearly-identifiable messages: don't tease people because they're different; don't fret about your being different because some day you'll discover what special gifts you have. A closer, deeper look at May of Andersen's tales (including "The Ugly Duckling." which is not on our reading list), reveals a darker, harder, more painful thread. People are often cruel and unfeeling, love is torturous--in general, the things of the material world cause suffering. There is often a happy ending, but it's not conventionally happy. Characters are rewarded, but only after they manage (often through death) to transcend the rigors of the mortal world.

Exercise and daily routines

One thing is certain. Most people do not get enough exercise in their routines. All of the advances of modem technology — from can openers to power steering— have made life easier, more comfortable and much less physically . Yet our bodies need activity, especially if they are carrying around too fat. Satisfying this need requires a definite plan, and a conunitment

Politician's Face

It is tempting to try to prove that good looks win votes, and many academics have tried. The is that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. and you cannot behold a politician's face without a veil of extraneous prejudice getting in the way. Does George Bush possess a disarming grim or a facetious ? Its hard to find anyone who can look at the president without assessing him politically as well as .

Musician Bach

Those were his halcyon days, when his music was heard constantly in Venice and his influence Europe. He spent much of his time on the road, and productions of his music. In Gernutny, Bach studied Vivaldi's scores, copied them for performance and some for other instruments.

Michael T. Madigan rubbish

In 2001 he received the SIIIC Outstanding Scholar Award_ In 2003 he received the Carski Award for Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching from the American Society for Microbiology, and he is an elected Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology. Mikes research is on bacteria that inhabit extreme environments, and for the past 1.5 years he has studied Antarctic microbiology. In addition to research papers, he has edited a major treatise on phototrophic bacteria and served for 10 years as chief editor of the Archives of Microbiology. He currently serves on the editorial board of the journals Environmental Microbiology and Anionic van 1.ecuwenhoek. Mikes nonscientific include forestry, reading, and caring for his dogs and horses. He lives a quiet lake with his wife, Nancy, four shelter dogs (Gaino, Peptic, Peanut, and Merry), and three horses (Eddie, Gwen, and Festus).

Space work for an astronaut

The space work for an astronaut can be inside or , inside they can monitor machines and the work is alongside the craft. They also need to make sure the Space Travel. Outside the craft, they can see how the seeds react in the space. Some seeds company send seeds to them to how seeds change their biological character. When outside the craft, they can experiments or clean up the space

Complementary therapies

Complementary therapies - such as those by naturopaths, chiropractors and acupuncturists - have become increasingly popular in Australia over the last few decades_ Interest initially coincided with for alternative lifestyles, while immigration and increased contact and trade with China have also had an influence_ The status of complementary therapies is being re-visited in a number of areas: regulation: the stances of doctors' associations; their inclusion in medical education; and scientific into their efficacy.

Japanese language

An eccentric mix of English, German and French has entered Japanese usage with grand . A "kariya" woman is a career woman, and a "manshon" is an apartment.This increasing use of katakana, or unique Japanese versions of Western words, and the younger generation's more casual use of the Japanese language have Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi to worry that these new words may not be by a wider audience. As a result, a government panel is proposing to publish a manual on how to speak proper Japanese. Foreign words became katakana Japanese because no existing Japanese words could quite capture a specific meaning or feeling. When the word "cool" traveled east, all of its English connotations did not make the journey. A kunt person in Japan is someone who is calm and never gets . On the other hand, someone who is kakkoii is hip, or in translation, "cool," Similarly, a hotto person is one who is easily , perhaps passionate, but not necessarily a popular person or personality of the moment.

TV advertising

From a child' s point of view, what is the purpose of TV advertising? Is on TV done to give actors the to take a rest or (practice) their lines? Or is it done to make people buy things? Furthermore, is the main difference between programs and commercials that commercials arc for real, whereas programs are not, or that programs are for kids and commercials for ? As has been shown several times in the literature (e.g. Butter et al. 1981; Donohue, Henke, and Donohue 1980: Macklin 1983 and 1987: Robertson and Rossiter 1974; Stephens and Stuns 1982), some children are able to between programs and commercials and are aware of the intent of TV advertising, whereas others are not.

Scientists

Scientists make observations, have assumptions and do . Mier these have been done, he got his . Then there are a lot of data from scientists. The scientists around the world have a of world.

The Romans glorified

The Romans glorified the shown in the arena, but trivialized the events and degraded the participants. Mosaic pictures of executions and combats, violent to our eyes, were displayed in the public rooms and even dining rooms in the homes of wealthy Romans. How can the viewer today possibly understand such images? Until fairly recently, modern authors writing about the arena minimized its significance and represented the institutionalized violence as a sideline to Roman history. The was also to view the events through our own eyes and to see them as pitiful or horrifying, although to most Romans empathy with victims of the arena was inconceivable. In the past few decades, however, scholars have started to analyze the complex motivations for deadly public entertainments and for contradictory views of gladiators as despised, yet beloved hero-slaves.

The contemporary ministerial staffing system

The contemporary ministerial staffing system is large, active and partisan - far larger and further evolved than any Westminster equivalent Ministers' demands for help to cope with the pressures of an increasingly competitive and professionalised political environment have been key drivers of the staffing system's development. But there has not been commensurate growth in to support and control it. The framework for ministerial staff is and ad hoc.

Dog

May be man's best friend. But man is not always a dog's. Over the centuries breeding has pulled at the canine body shape to produce what is often a grotesque distortion of the underlying wolf_ Indeed, some of these distortions are, when found in people, regarded as .

Dog breeding does, though, offer a chance to those who would like to understand how body shape is controlled. The of pedigree pooches is well recorded, their generation time is short and their litter size reasonably large, so there is plenty of material to work with. Moreover, breeds arc, by definition, inbred, and this simplifies genetic analysis. Those such as Elaine Ostrander, of America's National Human Genome Research institute, who wish to identify the genetic basis of the features of particular pedigrees thus have an ideal animal.

Impact and management of purple loosestrife

The invasion of non-indigenous plants is considered a primary threat to integrity and function of ecosystems. However, there is little quantitative or evidence for ecosystem impacts of invasive species. Justifications for control are often based on potential, but not presently realized, recognized or quantified, negative impacts. Should lack of scientific certainty about impacts of non-indigenous species result in postponing measures to prevent degradation? Recently, management of purple loosestrife, has been criticized for lack of evidence demonstrating negative impacts of L. salicaria, and management using biocontrol for lack of evidence documenting the failure of conventional control methods, Although little quantitative evidence on negative impacts on native wetland biota and wetland function was available at the onset of the control program in 1985. recent work has demonstrated that the invasion of purple loosestrife into North American freshwater wetlands alters rates and nutrient cycling, leads to reductions in wetland plant diversity, reduces pollination and seed output of the native Lythrum alatum, and reduces habitat suitability for specialized wetland bird species such as black terns, least bitterns. pied-billed grebes, and marsh wrens.

Conventional methods (physical, mechanical or chemical), have continuously failed to curb the spread of purple loosestrife or to provide satisfactory control. Although a number of generalist insect and bird species utilize purple ltioscstrife, wetland habitat specialists are excluded by of L. salicaria. We conclude that negative ecosystem impacts of purple loosestrife in North America justify control of the species and that detrimental effects of purple loosestrife on wetland systems and biota and the potential benefits of control outweigh potential risks associated with the introduction of biocontrol agents. Long-term experiments and monitoring programs that are in place will evaluate the impact of these insects on purple loosestrife. on wetland plant succession and other wetland biota.

Alaska's Aleutian islands

Alaska's Aleutian Islands have long been accustomed to shipwrecks_ They have been part of local consciousness since a Japanese whaling ran aground near the western end of the 1,1130-mile (1,800-km) volcanic in 1780, inadvertently naming what is now Rat Island when the ship's infestation ashore and made itself at home. Since then, there have been at least 190 shipwrecks in the islands.

Videu-conferencing Technology

Never has: the carbon footprint of multi-national corporations been under such intense scrutiny. Inter-city train journeys and long-haul flights to face-to-face business meetings contribute significantly to greenhouse gases and the resulting on the environment.

The Anglo-US company Teliris has introduced a new video-conferencing technology and partnered with the Carbon Neutral Company, enabling corporate outfits to become more environmentally responsible. The innovation allows simulated face-to-face meetings to be held across continents without the time or environmental of international travel.

Previous designs have enabled video-conferencing on a point-to-point, dual-location basis. The firm's VirtuaLive technology, however, can bring people together from up to five separate locations anywhere in the - with transmission quality.

Hans Christian Anderson

Fans of biograreeeal criticism have a luxurious source in the works of Hans Christian Andersen. Like Lewis Carroll (and, to a lesser extent, Kenneth Grahame), Andersen was near-pathologically uncomfortable in the company of adults. Of course all three had to work and with adults, but all three really related well to children and their simpler worlds. Andersen, for a time, ran a puppet theater and was incredibly popular with children, and, of course, he wrote an impressive body of fairy tales which have been produced in thousands of editions since the l 9th century_

Most everyone has read or at least knows the titles of many of Andersen's works: "The Ugly Duckling," "The Emperor's New Clothes," "The Nightengale," "The Little Mermaid," "The Match Girl," and many others. Though, as with most folk and fairy talcs, they adult re-readers much differently than they do young first-time readers.

Charming tales of ducks who feel because they don't fit in, only to exult in the discovery that they are majestic swans, gives child readers clearly-identifiable messages; don't tease people because they're ditTerent; don't let about your being different because some day you'll discover what special gifts you have.

A closer, deeper look at many of Andersen's talcs (including "The Ugly Duckling," which is not on our reading list), reveals a darker, harder, more thread. People are often cruel and unfeeling, love is torturous—in general, the things of the material world cause suffering_ There is often a happy ending, but it's not conventionally happy. Characters arc rewarded, but only after they manage (often through death) to transcend the rigors of the mortal world

Edible Insects

FANCY A locust for lunch? Probably not, if you live in the west, but elsewhere it's a different story. Edible insects - termites, stick insects, dragonflies, grasshoppers and giant water bugs - are on the menu for an 80 per cent of the world's population.

More than MOO species of insects are around the world. For example, "kungu cakes" - made from midges - are a in parts of Africa. Mexico is an insect-eating - or entomophagous - hotspot, where more than 200 insect species are . Demand is so high that 40 species are now under threat, including white agave worms. These caterpillars of the tequila giant-skipper butterfly fetch around $250 a kilogram.

Eating insects makes sense. Some contain more than meat or fish. The female gypsy moth, for instance, is about 80 per cent protein. Insects can be a good source of vitamins and too: a type of caterpillar (Lista teipsichorr) eaten in Angola is rich in iron, zinc and thiamine.

What do they taste like? Ants have a lemon , apparently, whereas giant water bugs taste of mint and fire ant pupae of watermelon. You have probably, , already tasted some of these things, as insects are often tourists in other types of food. The US Food and Drug Administration even issues guidelines for the number of insect pans in certain foods. For example, it is for 225 grams of macaroni to contain 225 insect fragments.

Copy right

No one in Parliament would know better than Peter Garrett what largesse copyright can confer so it may seem right that he should announce a royalty Far artists, amounting to 5 per cent of all sales after the original one, which can go on giving to their families for as much as 151) years. Rut that ignores the truth that copyright law is a scandal, recently by the Free Trade Agreement with the US which required extension of copyright to 70 years after death_

Is it scandalous that really valuable copyrights end up in the ownership of corporations (although Agatha Christie's no-doubt worthy great-grandchildren are still the benefits of West End success for her whodunnits and members of the Garrick Club enjoy the continuing fruits of A.A_ Milne's Christopher Robin books)? No. The is that bien pensants politicians have attempted to appear cultured by creating private assets which depend on an act of Parliament for their existence and by giving away much more in value than any public benefit could . In doing so they have betrayed our trust.

Skyscraper Fact

In 1929, auto tycoon Walter Chrysler took part in an intense race with the Bank of Manhattan Trust Company to build the world's tallest skyscraper. Just when it looked like the bank had captured the title, workers at the Chrysler Building jacked a thin spire hidden inside the building through the top of the roof to win the contest (subsequently losing the title four months later to the Empire State Building). Chrysler also decorated his building to mirror his cars, with hubcaps, mudguards, and hood ornaments.

Banking Overview

The first banks were probably the religious temples of the ancient world, and were probably established sometime during the third millennium B.C. Banks probably the invention of money. Deposits initially consisted of grain and later other goods including cattle. agricultural implements, and eventually precious such as gold, in the form of casy-to-earry compressed plates. Temples and palaces were the safest places to store gold as they were constantly attended and well . As sacred places, temples presented an extra deterrent to thieves.

Advertisements

Almost all public spaces nowadays have advertisements in sight, and all forms of media, from newspapers to the cinema to the Internet, are with adverts. This all-pervasive presence the value of advertising to us. Without it, businesses of all types and sizes would to inferm potential customers about the products or services they provide, and consumers would be unable to make assessments when looking for products to buy and services to use. Without advertising, the promotion of products and that contribute to our physical and psychological well-being — medicines to treat minor ailments, insurance schemes to protect us, clothes and cosmetics to make us look and feel better — would be more than it is. And without advertisements and the represented in them, the world would be a far place.

Job hunting

• When it comes to job-hunting, impressions are critical. Remember, you are marketing a product - yourself - to a potential employer. The first thing the employer sees when greeting you is your attire; thus. you must make every effort to have the proper dress for the type of job you arc seeking. Will dressing properly get you the job? Of course not, but it will give you a competitive edge and a first impression.

• How should you dress? Dressing conservatively is always the safest route, but you should also try and do a little investigating, of your employer so that what you wear to the interview makes you look as though you fit in with the organisation. If you overdress (which is rare but can happen) or under dress (the more likely scenario), the potential employer may feel that you don't care enough about the job.

Monkey and Shakespeare

This often used is the one that the monkey and the typewriters.

OK. We have a monkey sitting at a typewriter and the claim here is basically if you leave chance in time long enough you will get life. Don't worry about it, yes. its strange, yes it's wonderful, but leaves enough matter 600 million years on earth and you will have life.

So, the monkey sitting at the typewriter, the are eventually he produces the complete works of Shakespeare but he doesn't manage to do it in 600 million years. So what I decided to do is to nm the numbers. I saying typing the complete work of Shakespeare.

• I just nin the numbers for how long would it take a monkey typing one key a second. To type "to be or not to be that is the question" right? On average how long is it gonna take my monkey friend one a second.

I don't know how you think it would be. May be you could have a guess. Would it be less or more than 600 million years, which is the period life on earth isn't supposed to have within and when I run the numbers "to be or not to be is the question" takes 116 trillion trillion trillion years to type just that and a DNA string that something of that complexity emerges by chance undirected within 6(K) million years? Again, its mathematically possible but it's so incredible unlikely that it would have that it tilts me in favor oldie Christian story in which God creating life, simply a question of saying let that be and there was.

Stress — that tense feeling often connected to having too much to do, too many bills to pay and time or money — is a common emotion that knows few

About three-fourths of people in the United States, Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, South Korea and Britain reported experiencing stress on a daily basis, according to A P-Ipsos polling. Anxious feelings were more during the holidays.

Germans feel stress more intensely than those in other countries polled. People in the United States cited financial pressures as the top worry. About half the people polled in Britain said they frequently or felt that life was beyond their control. the highest level in the 10 countries surveyed.

Australia

Twelve hundred miles cast of Australia lie the islands of New Zealand, Long before thcy were by Europeans, a Polynesian race of warriors, the Maoris, had sailed across the Pacific from the northeast and established a civilization for the brilliance of its art and the strength of its military . When Captain Cook visited these islands towards thc end of thc century, he that the population numbered about a hundred thousand.

Medical Examination

The most common for carrying out a detailed medical examination of a dead person - a post-mortem or autopsy - is when it is necessary to the cause of death. In some circumstances, a doctor may be allowed to perform a post-mortem in pursuit of medical . The examination is usually performed by a pathologist, and dissection of the body, and tests done on blood, tissues and internal organs, but sometimes it is performed by a doctor.

Classroom Setting

• 1) table

• 2) To improve student

• 3) Every table has microphone and bulb to if students have questions or want to speak to the {{{entire|integrated|relax|perfect|full room.

Energy

( Improve) their health, , your protein (intake), (provide) sustainable (energy), when your body is (fed with) adequate amounts of quality protein

Reference Reading: From Protein to Amino Acids When the proteins you eat are digested, they're down into individual amino acids so that cells in your bott have access to whichever ones they need for the job at hand_ About 75 percent of amino acids are used to synthesize new proteins. These proteins help build and repair tissues, including muscles, bones and skin. They're also used to produce enzymes that digest food and activate your metabolism. Amino acids that aren't reassembled into proteins help make neurotransmitters and hormones.

Amino Acids Turned into Energy Amino acids are chemically to glucose except that they contain nitrogen. This means that even after protein is digested into amino acids, they must go through more steps to have the nitrogen removed. Once the nitrogen is gone, the amino acids are converted into glucose or fatty acids. Either way, they give you energy. Due to the extra steps, protein provides a slower but longer-lasting source of energy than carbohydrates, according to the Merck Manual Home Health Handbook.

Your Body's Energy Preferences When it's turned into , protein provides 4 calories of energy for every gram of protein you consume. This is the same amount you'll get from carbohydrates, but fats deliver 9 calories per gram. Any extra calories you consume are stored as fat because it's such a concentrated source of energy. When it needs energy, your body first uses glucose from carbohydrates, then fatty acids_ As long as you enough calories from other sources. protein is not turned into energy.

Folklove Folklore

A modem term for the body of traditional customs, superstitions, stories, dances and songs that have been adopted and maintained within a given by processes or repetition not reliant on the written Along with folk songs and folktales, this broad of cultural forms embraces all kinds of legends, riddles, jokes, proverbs, games, charms, omens, spells; and rituals, especially those of pre-literate societies or social classes_ Those forms of verbal expression that are handed on from one generation or locality to the next by word of mouth are said to constitute an oral .

Impressionist

Impressionism was a nineteenth century art movement that began as a loose association of Paris-based artists who started publicly exhibiting their art in the 1860s- Characteristics of Impressionist painting include visible brush strokes, light colors, open composition, on light in its changing qualities (often accentuating the effects of the passage of time), ordinary subject matter, and unusual visual angles. The name of the movement is derived from Claude Monet's Impression, Sunrise ( lmpres-sion, soleil levant). Critic Louis Leroy inadvertently coined the term in a satiric review published in Le Charivari.

Radicals in their time, early Impressionists broke the rules of academic painting. They began by giving colors, freely brushed, primacy over line, drawing from the work of painters such as Eugene l)elavroix. They also took the of painting out of the studio and into the world. Previously, not only still-lifes and portraits, but also landscapes had been painted indoors, but the Impressionists found that they could capture the momentary and transient effects of sunlight by painting en plein air (in plain air).

Poverty

Measuring poverty on a global scale establishing a uniform poverty level across extremely divergent economies, which can result in only rough comparisons. The World Bank has defined the international poverty line as U.S. $I and $2 per day in 1993 Purchasing Power Parity (PPP)l, which adjusts for differences in the of goods and services between countries. The $1 per day level is generally used for the least developed countries, primarily African; the $2-per-day level is used for middle economies such as those of Fast NNW and Latin America.

Sportswomen

Sportswomen's records are important and need to be preserved. And if the paper records don't , we need to get out and start interviewing people, not to put too fine a on it, while we still have a chance. After all, if the records aren't kept in some form or another, then the stories are too.

Heart Disease

If you have a disease — such as heart disease, diabetes, asthma, or back or joint pain — exercise can have important health . However, it's important to talk to your doctor before starting an exercise routine. He or she might have on what exercises are safe and any precautions you might need to take while exercising.

Ikebana

Ikebana is the Japanese art of flower arrangement. It is more than simply putting flowers in a , ikebana is a art in which nature and are brought together_ Contrary to the idea of a particolored or multicolored arrangement of blossoms, ikebana often emphasizes other areas of the . such as its stems and leaves, and puts emphasis on shape, line, and form. Though ikebana is an of creativity, certain rules govern its form. The artist's intention behind each is shown through a piece's color , natural shapes, iaacethl lines, and the implied meaning of the arrangement.

Essays

Essays are used as an assessment tool to your ability to research a topic and construct an , as well as your understanding of subject content. This dots not mean that essays are a 'regurgitation' of everything your lecturer has said the course. Essays are your opportunity to explore in greater aspects of the course - theories, issues, texts. etc. and in some cases relate these aspects to a context. It is your opportunity to articulate your ideas, but in a way; using formal academic style.

Neurons

In animals, movement is coordinated by a cluster of neurons in the spinal cord called the central pattern generator (CPG). This produces signals that drive muscles to rhythmically in a way that products running in-walking, depending on the of pulses. A simple signal from the brain instructs the CPG to switch between different , such as going from a standstill to walking.

Teenagers' brain

Your teenage daughter gets top marks in school, captains the debate team, and volunteers at a shelter for homeless people. Rut while driving the family car, she text-messages her best friend and rear-ends another vehicle.

How can teens be so clever, accomplished, and responsible—and reckless ? Easily, according to two physicians at Children's Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School (HMS) who have been the unique structure and chemistry of the adolescent brain. "The teenage brain is not just an adult brain with fewer miles on it,- says Frances E. Jensen, a professor of neurology. "It's a paradoxical time of . Thcsc arc people with very sharp brains, but they're not quite sure what to do with them."

University Science

University science is now in real crisis - particularly the non-telegenic, non-ology bits of it such as chemistry. Since 1996, 28 universities have stopped offering chemistry degrees, according to the Royal Society of Chemistry.

The society that as few as six departments (those at Durham, Cambridge, Imperial, UCL, Bristol and Oxford) could remain by 2014. Most recently, Exeter University closed down its chemistry department, blaming it on "market forces", and Bristol took in some of the refugees.

The closures have been blamed on a fall in student applications, but money is a : chemistry degrees are expensive to provide - compared with English, for example- and some scientists say that the way the government concentrates research on a small number of top departments. such as Bristol, exacerbates the problem.

Blood Flow

All approaches aim to increase blood flow to areas of tension and to release painful knots of muscle known as "trigger points", -Trigger points are tense areas of muscle that are almost constantly contracting," says Kippen. "The contraction causes pain, which in turn causes contraction, so you have a vicious circle. This is what deep tissue massage aims to break. "The way to do this, as I found out under Ogedengbe's elbow, is to apply pressure the point, stopping the blood flow, and then to release, which causes the brain to flood the affected area blood, encouraging the muscle to relax. At the same time, says Kippen, you can fool the tensed muscle relaxing by applying pressure to a complementary one nearby. "If you cause any muscle to contract, its opposite will expand. So you try to trick the body into relaxing the muscle that is in spasm."

Darkness in the Northern Hemisphere

The increasing darkness in the Northern I lemisphere this time of year "indicates to the plant that is coming on. So it starts recouping materials from the before they drop off Evergreens protect their needle-like foliage from freezing with coatings and natural antifreezes." But broadleaf plants, like sugar maples, birches, and sumacs, have no such protections. As a result. they their leaves. But before they do, the plants first try to important nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus.

Social Isolation

Sound depressing, even apocalyptic? Well, it could be the future. If government are right, about 20 years from now, two out of five households will be single . And there is evidence the situation is already . According to a report, Social Isolation in America, published in the American Sociological Review in 2006, the average American today has only two close friends, Twenty-five per cent of those surveyed said they do not have anyone to talk with about important things.

And yet, while some are a crisis in our ability to make friends. others are saying exactly the opposite. For example, MSN's Anatomy of Friendship Report., published last November, suggests that the average Briton has 54 friends - a spectacular rise of 64 per cent since 2003.


 

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